Skip to main content

About your Search

Today 4
( more )
CNN 17
KGO (ABC) 12
WRC (NBC) 12
FBC 11
( more )
English 397
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 398 (some duplicates have been removed)
of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
. >> anything you might want to add to that? >> yes, they're called a clean circuit. you use the m.c. cable or 12-three, 12-2, the whole circuit. the computer or the microwave. >> so if you can probably do it, it sounds like putting in some kind of metal conduit-clad cable or something that will really reduce the interference. read for me what all these little things mean here. let's tip it up a little bit. >> priority a.w.g. 6-3 type s.o.o. w 600 volt sunlight and water resistant. >> which means what? >> it means it's a cord rather than a cable or wire. the cord is not to be used for permanent wiring. this is a cord that is designed for temporary power. >> it's a big cord. >> it is, it's 50 amp. >> what do they mean when they say primary? >> i don't know what it means. american wire gauge, the six is the size of the aware, the 3 is the three conductors, the type s.o.o.w., that's extra hard use cord. the w stand for wet. 600 volts is the volts it's good for and in the sun and underwater. it's 90 degrees centigrade-rated. it can run as high as 180 degrees without deterioration. this can get
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
moreen beganin who is the chief financial officer and i think she gives us very accurate information and tell uses the direction we need togo in. i know the chief and i have faith in her and it's well placed. we have made fewer arrests and i think that will continue to occur. again we are focusing our efforts on moving forward but if there is anything you would like me to address now i'm on the administration side of the police department please don't hesitant to let me know either face-to-face or by email you all have my email address. >> thank you chief. >> any questions for me? okay thank you. >> good evening director griffin. >> good evening commissioners. this is a follow up presentation to one that was made back in september of last year, and we talked at that time about arrest reporting in san francisco and specifically about ucr, race reporting and ethnicity reporting. the first two slides are from that presentation just as a refresher what we talked about then and the remaining three are from this presentation. so going back what we talked about is why we were reportin
, and we are your appointees and we want to thank you for having us here. we will begin by expressing our appreciation to all of those who help us in our work on behalf of the over 15,000 english language learners in our district, and we did provide you with some written data which i will be loosely following in my beginning here. we're very grateful to our english language students and our representatives who continue to attend our bcc meetings and they voice their concerns to us and we're able to bring these issues forward, and to garner attention to them, and to make remedies. we're thankful for our translators who attend every meeting that we have, both spanish and can tonenies and some of the things that we were able to -- [inaudible] strict and with the help of our -- kristina wong and jennifer fong, the two people we work most closely with. we have a english learner program guide and we didn't have this before and it's also translated into english -- into spanish and conton easy and serves as a guide to our english learner family who is find coming to epc and to the district ver
.members --zip car; this legislation will allow us to serve currently underserved communities by going into otherwise prohibited areas.all, thank you. >>: thank you very much. any additional public comment? go ahead.hill neighbors. i have signed the student perhaps i didn't understand the point you just made. personally i support car sharing in general. i would be concerned if they were adding spaces to residential buildings that would not be there if it were not for car sharing. car sharing can be put into commercial buildings and hotels in our district and i mentioned thishill neighbors are opposing, and the developer is offering amenities that would support his conditional use, eliminating a senior housing that we are supporting, an extra car share units. i am bringing that up because maybe what you said it cannot be used in a conditional use but at any rate they're trying to do that. i hope that he could not possiblyback, and offer, which he is trying to do to get his conditional approval. >>: any other comments?douglas -- i would like to speak in opposition to this.jurisdiction so
exercise with the u.s. navy. the drills are being conducted off of south korea's east coast. we have more from seoul. it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. -- >> it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. a third nuclear test could lead the us and south korea to plan for a preemptive strike against the north in the future to prevent a nuclear missile launch. >> the us will have a nuclear submarine around the korean coast. the nuclear power can be deployed to korea. if the us and korea want, they will pre-empt, attack preemptively any time. >> they released footage of the president being briefed by security staff. >> north korea should pay the price for its provocation. we will recommend sanctions with practical effect. >> what was interesting was the wording, an explicit promise to carry out direct actions against north korea as part of the sanctions, a little more than a week after north korea said it would take strong, physical countermeasures against the south if it did so. it is very publicly responding to that challenge. from beijing, north korea's trad
. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look at your house, pop open the lid, look in there see what's going on in there it's not nice and clean like this. who has seen this around their house? everybody. each meter has a shut off. you want to find out where your gas meter is. you can keep track of your usage but you will know how to shut it off. here's the shut off. i have some tools up here, you can look at these. any hardware store has these. they fit on this and it allows you to turn off the gas. when we talk about the wheels it's these on top. if you have a broken pipe. they will spin like mad. when it's
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
center for mathematical progress. and we are delighted to have david goldhill join us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. what i think of to challenges of blind spots that conservatives have had on health care the first is that it tends to be liberals who criticize and critique our health care system largely because of the large on injured population and the reflexive intuitive response of conservatives have been to say the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system in the world would. don't mess with it, don't change it. the second blind spot in general and in health care is that we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with the charts and data and charts and the data are important. but a lot of times with the way the liberals have one argument is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child that is born with cystic fibrosis and how the child can't get health insurance. these
of the great depression. as the u.s. entered world war ii, how did a system of accounting become the key to building the american arsenal? by 1970, america was uncovering the negative effects of pollution. should we measure these hidden costs of economic growth? most of us decide how well we're doing economically by what we can afford to buy. can we calculate a nation's economic well-being by adding up those individual measurements? can we compare national figures over time to determine if our economy is making progress? u.s. economic growth-- what is the gross national product? with economic analyst richard gill, we'll explore that question on this edition of economics usa. i'm david schoumacher. these computer tapes at the bureau of economic analysis in washington document 50 years of america's economic growth. they provide access to the accounting system known as gnp. when the united states faced its worst economic crisis, the great depression, no such measuring tool existed, until this report went to the senate. copies of national income, 1929-1932 are scarce today, but back in 1934,
from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, the intervention calculation. (instrumental music) >> historically the u.s. leaned heavily on strategic interventions to help counter the influence of communism. >> the reagan doctrine was a notion that we would support those that sought to oppose soviet domination. >> during the cold war there was a polarized world - there was the soviet union, there was the united states and a lot of our interventions were used to block the advance of communism, and so very ideological basis for our, our interventions. >> and the u.s. has long retained the power to intervene at will. >> the united states has the capability, military capability, the power, literally the sort of capability to get things done. in
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's been tracking the high crimes and misdemeanors of wall stree
without physically separating the neighborhood. maybe you can report to us back later. >>: i am deputy director for park planning. yes there was discussion about the fence that i do not know what the final resolution was but i can get back to large.reduced to be more integrated into the neighborhood. >>: thank you. >>: i will open it up for public comment. i don't see any public comment. are there any members of the public that would like to make a comment? public comment will be two minutes.go ahead.and folsom. nice to see the city is putting resources into neighborhoods that really need itheights, etc. in terms of the deed restriction i thought it was interesting the idea of offense was mentioned now. it seems to me that in that area it might be worth having some sort of a fense in order to separate certain types of individuals, the police should have some sort of input about whether the fence is fair or not. with regards to new projects in this area of the city, it is long over due and hopefully it will be the type of project that is going to benefit the younger kids rather
as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from the governments here in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more abilit
westgate is away but we'll do our best without him. we have michael brown to help us through things. coming up on the program, we'll head out to hong kong where china is requiring a reinstruct during of the economy. >>> after that, of course, the super bowl wasn't just one of the on biggest sporting events of the year, it was one of the biggest days of the year for madison avenue. we'll take a look at which ads were touchdowns and were ads were fumbles. >> mariana rajoy meets angela merkel. >>> plus, upcoming elections that sylvia berlusconi has called his last great electoral and political battle. >>> the power to split up uk banks if they fail to -- activity. george osborne is expected to give the bank of england the responsibility to make sure banks are involved in these activities. you have to love the extended analogy. watch the george osborne speech live here at 10:30 local for those of you here with us in the uk. in the meantime, there are more charges at the top over at barclay's. last night, the bank's financial chief and financial chief announced their leaving. tomorrow, barclay's
for joining as. do not forget to record airshow if you cannot catch us live. have a great weekend and a great night. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created last month, almost 170,000 people, however, dropped out of the workforce, despite all of that. the national unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage. it now stands at 7.9. eight and a half million people have dropped out of the work force since president obama took office. the developments overseas tonight. a suicide bomber attack. the u.s. embassy in turkey. killing one, injuring three others. the white house calling it an act of terrorism, the eighth attack on a u.s. embassy since hillary clinton was named secretary of state. coming on this, her less than the job. president obama to they retreated on the obamacare contraception mandate. the department of health and human services announcing that religiously af
- the structures that have mixed use homes above and business below when you do the improvement it does help us bring us together on this program - there is a california office of historical preservation we can look at assess built and those structures as they're going through size save and preserving the historic nature of these. so over the next 8 months our office and some private cast inspectors are going to start working together >> well, there's a meeting on friday that's going to cover this. >> right and in this - in the scope - i mean working with the structures that center the mixed use those structures will be the last structures to be working with and so last week we did have a meeting to talk about what we can do on the financing side. the landlords will deal with the earth quake side but written into the lease the tenants will be responsible for certainly things >> we do have the buildings identified how do we coordinate this with the landlord and others. we're thinking about this well, in advance. also i want to note in terms of ada last meeting i talked about the one dollar tha
else on the bridge line? >> no. okay. before we move on, i want to encourage those who have joined us since the beginning of the meeting to fill out a card, if they miss to speak at the public hearing coming up. you can find cards at the front of the room here. thank you. agenda i'm item no. 5, report from the director of the mayor's office on disability. carla. >> thank you. i'm carla johnson, the interim director of the mayor's office on disability. the first announcement that i would like to make is that as we were listening to the reading of the agenda a little earlier and the discussion about the accessible meeting information here at city hall, i just wanted to provide a quick update for people who are using mobility devices to let you know that right now the lift at the carlton goodlett street entrance formerly known as the polk street entrance is not operational and we're ordering a replacement for it soon. so if you are coming to city hall, please come by any the other three accessible entrances which would be the van ness side of the building, the mcallister or grove side
of the hastings law student and faculty as well so please join us. and i also p want to say the mayor of oakland i can't even khan and our former colleague and reverend norman were also very active in the case as was normany, my colleague and many others as well and we are hoping that this reenact enactment of the case will bring light to the civil rights issues and how it links up with current day struggles as well and i also wanted to let you know that on thursday morning i'lling joining the richmond police station, the district attorneys office and many community based groups and merchants in promotes our 16th annual lunar year crime prefix for the district and so we will be meeting to raise awareness for public safety in the richard district and in the chinese couldn't and we are using the opportunity during the lunar season to race awareness in what we call senior blessing and -- stems and they have gone up and this is an opportunity for us to raids awareness and i would like to thank the san francisco pete's office owe association and many others for fundings and designing these new reusab
us. tom sullivan show, we are open for business 24/7. check out our facebook page. follow me on twitter and all the ways to contacted us are on the web page which is my name tom sullivan. thanks for joining us. make sure and tune into the radio show. we're on fox news talk, seer ios every weekday from putting to 6:00 p.m. we'll have another great show for you on fox business. in the meantime, i hope to hear lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created last month, almost 170,000 people, howeever, droppd out of the workforce, despite all ofthat. the national unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage. it now stands at 7.9. eight and a half million people have dropped out of the work force since president obama took office. the developments overseas tonight. a suicide bomber attack. the u.s. embassy in turkey. killing one, injuring three others. the white house c
for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esote
: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cure's global women's cancer summit. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president, but she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inaug
us about the time frame preceding this loud boom that everybody heard that perhaps there was some different changes in negotiations discussions with the suspect mr. dykes? >> no, there was no indication that there was any change in the discussion. police were telling us what they were telling us each time they came out to brief us that nerp keeping the line of communication through that pvc pipe open 24/7. the sheriff gave us more information that most of the communication had taken place during the daylight hours. but no indication that anything had changed or that we were close to a resolution, kimberly. >> jonathan here is dana perino. >> i had a question about the coordination between the local police the fbi and whoever else is involved. that was an amazing level of skill at that local level to be able to do that negotiation to keep that going for 7 days and to bring it to what sounds like a successful conclusion for the boy. >> it is indeed, dana. it has been the presence of virtually every branch of police that you can image being out here. you have the sheriff's office ove
like today. all the 49er championship games have been extraordinarily busy for us and this will be another one. probably even busier. >> it was some concern there might be a shortage of chicken wings due to last year's drought. that's because it drives up the cost of food for the chickens. it is not true americans will consume more than a billion wings this weekend. >> all right. the super bowl is typically the most watched television event of the year and it turns out many people use that as an excuse to get a new tv. the past several years, tv sales spiked before the super bowl. this year was no exception. especially here in niner territory. >> at least 25% more sales when our home team is in the super bowl. a lot of people want a super bowl party and what better thing to have, especially the way they've been coming down in prices. >> experts stay boom in big screen tv stores has been especially good in brick and mortar stores. >>> a bay area mom said she has a little bit of an idea what the harbaugh family is going through on a-smaller scale, of course. >> she i
for the program,. [applause] >> so we're really happy that you're giving us time to talk about mentoring for success, quite a movement that is happening right now in mentoring and we appreciate the recognition of national mentoring month. we did give you materials to keep to the time limit and it does have some snapshot of some information with pretty pictures and graphs and stuff so you should check it out, and just so we're all on the same page. the formal definition of mentoring is a structured and purposeful relationship between a caring adult and a young person so that's what we're talking about here and we know one thing is if students don't feel connected it's harder for them to succeed and we know that caring adults build assets for our youth. you simply can't succeed if you're not connected. it's human nature. that's why mentoring for success is fostering those relationships in our district. no two relationships look the same so we have a couple of mentors here and a student that will share about their experience in a bit so yeah. >> under the umbrella of student community s
and to the citizens who are the fabric and texture and color of san francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders, young artists, queer and colorful, innovators and students, all inside our magnificently and uniquely diverse and never-changing city. san francisco will never be what it was, nothing in life will be. but as i heard recently, we are always nostalgic for a time that never was and often wanting to avoid a future that is inevitable. will change in san francisco as in everywhere is inevitable. and change can be beautiful. we are all of us the agents of change. as george and harvey were. each one of us is the story teller of our lives and the lives of the people we've lost. and that wasn't always the case, as willie mentioned. but because of the likes of george and harvey and so many others, all the way to our mayor ed lee, all of us have voice. all of us can tell the story. so, let's crowd source this thing. let's tell the real stories of george and harvey. sto
been an important opportunity for us to really put some considered thought into the proposal. what you have in front of you is better than airplane reading. there are some suggestions in this energy 2020 document that people will look at and they will argue and they will say -- that is one person's view. that is true, that is true. but while we are trying to do is not give you a legislative package starting with initiatives that we are going to kind of clicked off as we move forward. this is really designed to be a discussion blueprint. we want to try to change the conversation. one of the reasons we have to think about changing the conversation is because the energy paradigm has really shifted. think about where we were one decade ago. it was all about scarcity, shortages, and how much dependent we were on foreign sources for our oil. fast forward to where we are today. those once thought of import terminals are looking to the export terminals. we have made considerable gains in terms of our own energy independence, to the point where it is no longer just a slogan that we are talking
:00 in the morning for frederick county and washington county. you may get an inch or two up there. the rest of us are going to get a small amount somewhere under an inch. let's track it with you and show how we expect things to go coming your way in a few minutes. >> see you in a bit. another big story. this image of the president with a rifle bringing the gun control debate back to center stage. traveled to the midwest to put pressure on law makers. tom joins us now. this trip expected to be the first of many. >> the administration's goal is to build on what it sees as momentum following last week's hearing on gun control. supporters of the president's plan say time is important. they want to hold on to the public's attention. gun rights advocates say is they saw a rush to pass new gun laws in their view has eased. >> president obama led a round table in an effort to rewrite gun laws. >> which don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> that something includes 23 gun control proposals the president endorsed after the school shooting. limiting ammunition clips and exp
will be it. it comes with 10,000 apps. you only need to carry one phone for personal and corporate use. >> yet, there is a black bearry balance feature that lets a company put their apps and wall paper in a segregated think in a sandbox and you can't see that without a password. >> it has been an extraordinary week. we have dwo two of the smartests in the world joining me. allen blinder is joining me and former vice-chairman of the federal research and shore auth "after the music stops". it is good to have you on the program. >> so much to discuss. allen we got the employment report for the month of january. and then we got the gdp report. what does this tell you about what we are in the recovery? >> what you need to do is average through the third quarter which is higher than it should have been. why do i say that? >> you have this big bounce up in government spending in general. that seemed mysterious and then it disappears. if you average those two. if you average those two, it looks like it has been looking like a 2% minus growth traject tri which is far from zero but not very good
, william smith, and patricia brady. please let us know about the book fair and post them to our wall at booktv or e-mail us at author jared diamond talks about his book and the way people live in human existence. what we can learn from traditional societies. >> i would like to invite doctor diamond to the stage. please give him a warm welcome to the seminar. [cheers] [applause] >> let me first check if you can see be okay. can you hear me in the back? it is a great pleasure to be back in philadelphia today and back and this wonderful library to talk about a subject other than gall bladders. [laughter] >> to give me an idea how many may find what i'm about to tell you a practical value. please reason into one of the other of two questions are lasker the first is, could you raise your hand if you are over age 65 years old or hope to live past age 65? or have a parent or grandparent over 65 years old red many of you, all right. the second group, please raise your hand if you are under 65 and have no intention living past 65 and do not have a parent or grandparent pass
tracking numbers on guns. but finally city mayors are trying to use their financial might to help citizens and police officers help keep them safe. the national conference of democratic mayors is launching an initiative to grade gun manufacturers. the grades will be based on things like gun company's public statements on safety regulations and their lobbying expenditures and then cities can use the grades to choose from whom they actually guy their police guns. it may sound a little bit familiar, and that's because it's the same strategy that the nra has used for years in grading congress on how gun friendly they are. one of the cities which has taken the lead on this initiative is minneapolis. today's it's mayor said . . . >> jennifer: this is just the latest move in a series of successful measures that minneapolis has taken to curb gun violence so from 2003 to 2006, minneapolis was rocked by a crime wave that killed 80 people under the age of 25 making homicide the leading cause of death for minneapolis's young people. the city has been stuck with the un
of life. those of us who work with babies are able to enjoy the rapid growth that occurs during the child's earliest years and form deep, affectionate bonds with each baby in our care-- bonds that we now know can impact a child for life. but sometimes, caring for infants and toddlers in a group setting can be demanding and difficult. how do we know when we are doing the right thing with our infants and toddlers? what if a baby won't stop crying? what if a toddler refuses to put on her jacket? and what about those magnificent temper tantrums for which 2-year-olds are so famous? hello. i'm joanne hendrick, the author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at some of the important components that go into providing consistent, one-on-one relationships with infants and toddlers in group settings. we'll observe some infant and toddler programs in private child-care centers, university lab schools, and family day-care homes, and we'll hear from infant and toddler teachers who offer practical advice for working with our youngest children. read
for the best up to the minute coverage on and off the field. stay here with us. >> ama: now to san francisco. where tomas roman caught up with some ravens fans. >> dan: some say they fear for their safety and you hate to hear that. >> it's a sad thing, especially on day like today. the owners and operators half dear mom here on 16th street say they lost thousands of dollars in tips and sales and it's all because of a few people who become violent whenever a competing team comes into town for a big game. >> more than 200 baltimore raven fans were expected to be inside dear mom in san francisco, cheer on their team. but owners were told the party might be a dangerous idea. >> police officers letting my bosses know there were threats against the bar. they had to shut down today. >> amanda works a tavern in the mission district, which is owned by at the operators or dear mom. the threats're specific and they'ring. >> basically shooting, drive-by shooting and other violence. >> raven fans club posted this cancellation notice on their facebook page friday in part it reads the san francisco police
us in the possi >> and the ravens have won it! 34-31. >> but the niners did fight back, but the 22-point comeback proved to be too large. they lost by three points. they certainly played well. i'm ama daetz. >> dan: i'm dan ashley. we're live above mission district. the city is quite tame after this loss. police have been called to a few distinction but at this point no significant problems. >> ama: 49er fans were brace to go celebrated after an amazing come back in the third quarter. sky7hd caught two incidents of fireworks being set off in the mission district. >> dan: there were a number of arrests but no reports of major problems. tomas ramon is in north beach live where big crowds packed bars. they left with a different mood than they had hoped to leave with. >> they left a lot more somber than when they arrived. it's pretty quiet. police that were stationed are sent to other potential problem areas in the city. let me give you a look about an hour ago. >> they were called out to the sported bar because of rowdy behavior around 7:00. more than 20 officers took up positions in
his own form of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself. those of you that know
a clipper racing towards the east coast could bring us more snow later tonight. first look at the forecast. gary? >> another one of these clippers going to come through. we're already seeing it now on radar. so some of us may have to deal with this on the evening commute. it's already beginning to work into sections of frederick county. this is coming in pretty quick. you can see west to east. temperatures for the most part marginal. i do anticipate for the next couple hours at least temperatures getting down to freeze handwriting and maybe a little colder than that. let's watch out for slick spots on the places that are untreated. here is the larger picture as we look at radar again. alberta clipper, they come through quickly, drop a little bit of snow. mostly, we're talking about dusting to a covering much like we've gotten the last couple times these clippers have come through this past weekend. some places maybe getting up to a half an inch or fluffy one inch. this is coming on through. supposed to get out of here later. we'll talk more about this in your evening foreca
is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from inside that country. what the afghan people fear might happen when u.s. forces leave. >>> plus, lights out at the super bowl. did you catch this? a power outage putting the big game on hold for more than a half an hour. what was the behind the blackout? jenna: let's not jinx anything. we need our lights. jon: we do. it is all "happening now." jon: first up today, that terrifying hostage situation in alabama now in its 7th day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: what a story. good morning everybody, i'm jenna lee. drones are now flying over that underground bunker where police say jimmy lee dykes is holding a 5-year-old boy
>>> that's what's making news america this morning. >> stay with us for "good morning america." have a wonderful monday, everyone. >> live and in hd, this is "good morning washington," on your side. >> the ravens are world champions. >> perhaps he put it perfectly by saying that the super bowl went from a blowout to a blackout. the ravens had just enough shoes to be the 49ers and give ray lewis a second ring to end his nfl career. >> the ravens look ok right now, although that might change this morning -- good morning, it is monday, february 4. >> quite a weekend. a lot to talk about. especially weatherwise. let's get to meteorologists about what we sow. >> just a trace of snow. it seems like more because we had those flurries pretty much nonstop throughout the day. temperature wise, you are waking up to middle to upper 20s. $26 -- 26 at dulles. you can see the snow shower from chicago over to indiana. that will had our way late tonight. it could clip the tail end of rush hour. the biggest window for this would probably be between 8:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. just another dusting.
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
ones if you want you can go help out other people in your city. there it is, a place for us to gather as nert members and there's our nert ics area. here is our structure. same kind of set up, sort of our version. command policy section, the planning group, they are up on top. then once things get rolling, you have your operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is there a fire, yes or no, damage, are there people injured, dead, can you get there. where, what, any sort of damage, are there people involved, can you get to it? here is a nert status sheet. basically if you send somebody out, you want to send the members' names, what time they went out, when they came back, what the assignment was, any comments, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do
: this is a desert, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 398 (some duplicates have been removed)